UNIVARSITY.ORG | Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander knowledges Seminar Series 4: Visual Arts
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15 Dec Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander knowledges Seminar Series 4: Visual Arts



Our fourth seminar focuses on visual art, and will be held on Friday, September 21. We look forward to welcoming three distinguished presenters – Djon Mundine and Janelle Evans.
Djon Mundine OAM, a member of the Bandjalung people of northern New South Wales, is a distinguished pioneer Aboriginal curator and artist. As a foremost figure in the Australian art world, he is an activist, writer, commentator, and critic. Djon will speak about the concept of art curation within Aboriginal knowledges, and how art was created as a communal, social and political act as a reaffirmation of and commitment to the relationship or participants to each other, to society, to the land-environment and to the spiritual cosmos.
Janelle Evans is of Dharug descent. She is an award-winning visual artist who exhibits internationally, and is a current PhD candidate at the University of Sydney, where she also teaches painting. Janelle will be talking to us about the concept of NAANYILI, which means deep looking in the Sydney Dharug language, and how she has applied this to her current exhibition which creatively reinterprets the objectifying photographic practice of nineteenth-century colonial ethnographers, inviting the viewer to find new ways of perceiving Aboriginal women than that projected by the myths and stereotypes formulated during the colonial period.

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