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10 Dec KU Theatre – Learners conduct Shakespeare in first pronunciation

KU Theatre - Learners Conduct Shakespeare In First Pronunciation



KU Theatre professor Paul Meier, in collaboration with Linguist David Crystal, are staging the initially-ever American rendition of a Shakespeare enjoy in its first pronunciation. Right here, KU Theatre college students rehearse a scene in first pronunciation from the enjoy “A Midsummer Night’s Desire.”

KU Theatre - Learners Conduct Shakespeare In First Pronunciation
KU Theatre - Learners Conduct Shakespeare In First Pronunciation
KU Theatre - Learners Conduct Shakespeare In First Pronunciation
KU Theatre - Learners Conduct Shakespeare In First Pronunciation
KU Theatre - Learners Conduct Shakespeare In First Pronunciation

KU Theatre - Learners Conduct Shakespeare In First Pronunciation

KU Theatre - Learners Conduct Shakespeare In First Pronunciation

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MOST RECENT COMMENTS
19 Comments
  • Tristan Jones
    Posted at 10:47h, 10 December

    Comparing this performance to Ben and David Crystals. The latter sounds quite West Country, while the former strongly reminds me of Irish accents in Leinster in particular.

  • David Stewart
    Posted at 10:47h, 10 December

    Was Shakespeare from Dublin?

  • Paul Meier
    Posted at 10:47h, 10 December

    It was an honor and a privilege working with David Crystal on this project. And I love reading all your comments. For more videos on dialects and language, please see https://www.youtube.com/user/PaulMeierDialects. And for more information on OP, I would invite you to visit http://www.paulmeier.com/shakespeare/.

  • seanmurrell85
    Posted at 10:47h, 10 December

    From what I have read, supposedly the United States accent is supposed to be the closest to what was spoken during Shakepearian times. That is according to what most linguists have stated. Now which region of the US was not stated clearly but, my guess would either be the inland northern dialect or, possibly the New England region.

  • Trent Report
    Posted at 10:47h, 10 December

    Clearly the pronunciation here is wrong as you can tell by the subtitles that words like 'bear' and 'fear', 'word' and 'sword' have rhymed and yet neither of them pronounced it so that they would rhyme. A gaping whole, in my opinion.

  • Yuri Ivanov
    Posted at 10:47h, 10 December

    @ Ross L:  They do, don't they?  It at least sounds like she's trying to make them rhyme, but it's hard to do when you're used to them sounding different from each other.

  • FermatWiles
    Posted at 10:47h, 10 December

    Shakespeare in Jeans, yeah. That makes perfect sense. And their acting is horrible.

  • MsMilagrita
    Posted at 10:47h, 10 December

    Actually it takes more than changing my for me, to imitate the early modern English. I've seen the Globe performance in OP and it was very illuminating as to the original rhyme&rhythm – nothing like this. I think the students would benefit from getting some Slavic or Spanish native speaker, to catch up with their Rs, Os etc.

  • David Legg
    Posted at 10:47h, 10 December

    Irish accent, doest I detect?

  • Paul Clenton
    Posted at 10:47h, 10 December

    Probably very close to the OP, but perhaps not so much that of Warwickshire.

  • Alison Inconstanti
    Posted at 10:47h, 10 December

    You learn the basics of acting in theatre – it can all be toned down for the screen. Many actors love the theatre and do TV & film just to make money to support their stage work.

  • Alison Inconstanti
    Posted at 10:47h, 10 December

    Because David Crystal did a lot of research into the type of accent used in Shakespeare's day. When the Old English accent is used rhymes and puns that fall flat in Modern English actually work

  • sarnobyl
    Posted at 10:47h, 10 December

    I wish that the full version in costume was up!

  • PimpPancreas
    Posted at 10:47h, 10 December

    Actually, the pronunciations you hear from modern English people were taught to them, about 200 years ago. They didn't always sound like the BBC English. If you read the history of the language, it was claimed an American could pass for an Englishmen in London, yet a Brit couldn't pass for an American in the colonies. Guess which dialect diverged from the other? You can read for yourselves.

  • ferociousgumby
    Posted at 10:47h, 10 December

    Working-class Irish. Maybe Shakespeare was me great-great-great grandfather!

  • catlover10192
    Posted at 10:47h, 10 December

    What are you on about. They are expressing themselves like a normal human being would. Then again, actually human beings don't seem like something you would be all that familiar with, being a theatre snob. In it's day Shakespeare's work was common entertainment As such,I'm resonably confident that the bard would rather have his works enjoyed, than snobbed over like people do.

  • Amit
    Posted at 10:47h, 10 December

    This acting is impossibly hammy.

  • Jani Lindström
    Posted at 10:47h, 10 December

    It isn't unrecognizable, and you don't need subtitles for Shakespeare when done all proper. But Chaucer is Very Early Modern English, only a few centuries afore (to use an archaism). Old English, the one before William the Bastard's conquest, that was way different.

  • lordhoot1
    Posted at 10:47h, 10 December

    Are you sure about that? Early Modern English wasn't radically different to Modern English. We're not talking about Chaucer, after all

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