UNIVARSITY.ORG | Stanford Students Design Recyclable Laptop with Autodesk Inventor Software
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19 Nov Stanford Students Design Recyclable Laptop with Autodesk Inventor Software



A class of Stanford University graduate students have been honored as the Autodesk Inventor of the Month for October for developing a prototype of the recyclable Bloom laptop.

The Bloom is the project of a team of students from Stanford and Finland’s Aalto University who were given the task to create a recyclable consumer electronics product that makes electronics recycling a simpler, more effective and engaging process for consumers. The students used Autodesk Inventor and Autodesk Inventor Publisher software to help develop and refine the innovative laptop during the school year. Creating 3D digital prototypes of the hardware components inside the laptop aided in creating a readily accessible laptop design that is also easy to disassemble.

When separated into different material types — such as plastics, metals and circuitry — the Bloom laptop’s modular design makes it easy for consumers to decrease the amount of electronic waste added to landfills. For example, 1.9 to 2.2 million tons of electronics became obsolete in 2005, with only 345,000 to 379,000 tons being recycled. The Bloom can be disassembled in just two minutes, without tools and in just 10 steps. By comparison, a commercially available laptop takes about 45 minutes to disassemble, requires three separate tools and involves as many as 120 steps.

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MOST RECENT COMMENTS
18 Comments
  • Andria Jones
    Posted at 10:40h, 19 November

    8 years later…and still not on the market?! sounds about right

  • Angel Gutierrez
    Posted at 10:40h, 19 November

    amazing stuff, and important too

  • wekesa zab
    Posted at 10:40h, 19 November

    great..

  • IcedLipGloss
    Posted at 10:40h, 19 November

    wow i can barely make a tree on inventor….

  • in Dogs We Trust
    Posted at 10:40h, 19 November

    This Laptop Will Cost Too much Money To Product. You Can Disassemble A Regular Laptop in Less Than 10 Minutes, if you Know What you're Doing……….

  • Scooby Donkers
    Posted at 10:40h, 19 November

    @ebeck999 I agree with you there.

  • Eli
    Posted at 10:40h, 19 November

    This Aaron fellow is a fine piece of ass. I bet he gets all the half jewish half Korean girls and french girls too.

  • c433z
    Posted at 10:40h, 19 November

    @quangluu96 That's called a nettop. Not very useful compared to a laptop.

  • Christopher Horton
    Posted at 10:40h, 19 November

    One of the reasons I prefer a desktop is that I can easily build, customize, and upgrade my own hardware without hassle. Hopefully this will bring about something similar for laptops. I'd buy one (or the components for one) without hesitation.

  • tryceo
    Posted at 10:40h, 19 November

    very thick it will be… Pretty useless though…

  • MythOfEchelon
    Posted at 10:40h, 19 November

    Very fragile?

  • Justin Knichel
    Posted at 10:40h, 19 November

    i see this innovation becoming the future of laptops. not only is it good for the consumer, because it is easily recyclable, and easy to understand, but form factors could be created, leading to a potential mainstream market for building custom laptops, the same way that people are able to build their own desktops

  • Aryanpars Irani
    Posted at 10:40h, 19 November

    potential for upgradeable laptops anyone?

  • Thomas Wong
    Posted at 10:40h, 19 November

    Autodesk, at the end your video, you mention this video can't be shared without written expression from you. Yet I can click on the share and embedded button. Are you expecting the user of youtube spam you with email when they share it on social media websites? Get real.

  • emorozov
    Posted at 10:40h, 19 November

    Hujnja

  • BLACKBINLATIN
    Posted at 10:40h, 19 November

    pure genius… pure win

  • David Laid
    Posted at 10:40h, 19 November

    i like it

  • seth shubirg
    Posted at 10:40h, 19 November

    beautiful

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